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SCOTUS Rules in Favor of Hobby Lobby!

IN 5-4 DECISION, SUPREME COURT SIDES WITH HOBBY LOBBY

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Read Supreme Court Ruling Here.
(Justice Alito authored the Majority Opinion of the Court)

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SENATOR TED CRUZ: Landmark Victory for Religious Liberty
Statement on Burwell v. Hobby Lobby

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, today released the following statement commending the Supreme Court’s decision in Burwell v. Hobby Lobby.

“Today the Supreme Court handed our nation a landmark victory for religious liberty. The decision affirms that Americans, contrary to what the Obama Administration attempted to impose, have a right to live and work in accordance to their conscience and can’t be forced to surrender their religious freedom once they open a business.

“This ruling is a repudiation of the Obama Administration’s untenable position that people with sincerely held religious beliefs should be forced to comply with an unconstitutional mandate while a parade of waivers, exemptions, and delays are granted for purely commercial and political interests.

“In making this ruling the Court relied on the Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which was passed with broad bipartisan support, proving the strength and necessity of the legislation and showing the nation the effectiveness members of Congress can have when they work together to protect religious liberty.

“Certainly, the struggle for religious freedom will continue, as cases made by hundreds more plaintiffs will wend their way through the courts. The right to religious liberty, as enshrined in the First Amendment, remains under an incredible assault by this Administration on a variety of fronts. But, with this decision, I am hopeful that the courts will also work to safeguard the religious liberty for non-profits, such as the Little Sisters of the Poor and others, just as the Supreme Court did today for private businesses.”

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Wall Street Journal
Supreme Court Exempts Some Companies From Health-Care Law on Religious Grounds
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday in a 5-4 split said “closely held” companies can on religious grounds opt out of a federal health-care law requirement that companies provide contraception coverage for employees, carving another piece from President Barack Obama’s signature domestic achievement. In a ruling by Justice Samuel Alito, the court’s five conservative justices wrote that private companies, such as Hobby Lobby Stores Inc., can’t be forced to provide contraceptive health services that violate their owner’s religious beliefs.

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Fox News
Supreme Court Backs Hobby Lobby In Contraceptive Mandate Challenge
Justice Samuel Alito wrote the majority opinion in the ObamaCare case. The court’s four liberal justices dissented. The court stressed that its ruling applies only to corporations that are under the control of just a few people in which there is no essential difference between the business and its owners. Alito also said the decision is limited to contraceptives under the health care law. “Our decision should not be understood to hold that an insurance-coverage mandate must necessarily fall if it conflicts with an employer’s religious beliefs,” Alito said (6/30).

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The Political Insider
In a stunning upset to President Barack Obama, the Supreme Court rejected the argument that employers must be forced to pay for contraceptives, regardless of religious and moral beliefs.

The justices’ 5-4 decision Monday is the first time that the high court has ruled that profit-seeking businesses can hold religious views under federal law. And it means the Obama administration must search for a different way of providing free contraception to women who are covered under objecting companies’ health insurance plans.

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